Rocky Mountain Wa Shonaji Quilt Guild 2020 Virtual Exhibit

Theme: We The People

Quilt Contest

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Category 1

"We The People"

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Category 2

"Colorado Architecture - Buildings & Bridges"

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Title: Joanne Walton – Arvada, CO – “Drunkards Path = Prohibition, Women’s Suffrage, and Slavery”
Author: Deleted user
Votes: ?

Category: We The People
Views: ?
Description: The Drunkard’s Path quilt block dates to ancient Egyptian times. This block has been tied to the Women’s Temperance Movement in the early 1900’s as well as a possible link to the Underground Railroad during the late 1700’s until the Civil War in 1862. Prohibited from voting, the Drunkard’s Path was a popular way for a woman to express her opinion on alcohol and its use. It appears that more quilts were made for this cause than for any other. Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban (the 18th Amendment) on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 to 1933. In 1933, the 21st amendment repealed the 18th amendment and “Happy days were here again” in America. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the Women’s Suffrage Movement, which resulted in the passage of the nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, which finally allowed women the right to vote. Americans today are likely to recognize the names Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, not because of their work with the temperance movement, but from their efforts for women’s suffrage. Their work is also important for the Temperance movement because it was clear to them that giving women the right to vote was the only way they could ban alcohol. In that way, Prohibition and Women’s Suffrage went hand in hand. Also note that Frederick Douglas became one of the most outspoken advocates of abolition and women’s rights in the 19th century. He urged an immediate end to slavery.

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